Police: Va. man bites dog, off-duty FBI agent

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MANASSAS, Va. (AP) — Police say a Virginia man bit his dog and an off-duty FBI agent, leaving both with minor injuries.

Prince William County police tell news outlets an officer saw 31-year-old Cory Michael Phillips apparently intoxicated Tuesday and standing naked in a road.

A police statement says the officer used pepper spray when Phillips ignored commands. Police say the agent stopped to assist and a struggle ensued, during which Phillips bit the 51-year-old agent’s neck. Phillips was subdued. The officer sustained minor injuries.

Police say Phillips had smoked marijuana at his home that morning. Police say he squeezed and bit his dog and pushed a 60-year-old neighbor to the ground. She wasn’t hurt.

Phillips was released from a hospital and charged with offenses, including animal cruelty. It’s unclear if he has a lawyer who could comment.

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Ex-con, kennel owner joins wife in facing bestiality charges

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SUFFOLK, Va. (AP) — An ex-convict and kennel owner in Virginia has joined his wife in being indicted on charges of bestiality and animal cruelty.

The Virginian-Pilot reports 48-year-old Richard Patterson was indicted this week on the same charges filed against 42-year-old Christina Patterson months ago.

Patterson was sentenced to eight years in prison in November after pleading guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon and obstructing justice.

Federal agents investigating his weapons sales discovered videos of the couple having sex with a dog. The Pattersons owned Imperial K-9 LLC at the time.

Court documents say the couple had the male dog’s front toenails removed to facilitate the sex acts.

The newspaper report didn’t include comment from Patterson.

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German diplomat’s son again denied parole in 1985 killings

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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — For the 14th time, Virginia officials have rejected a parole bid from a German diplomat’s son serving life in prison for the 1985 killings of his ex-girlfriend’s parents.

The Daily Progress reports 52-year-old Jens Soering initially confessed to killing Nancy and Derek Haysom, but later recanted, saying he was covering for Elizabeth Haysom. She was convicted of being an accessory, and will receive mandatory parole in 2032.

Attorney Steven D. Rosenfield says Soering is a model prisoner and has a “solid release plan” that would return him to Germany. Rosenfield says the German Embassy and Chancellor Angela Merkel back Soering’s release.

Former Gov. Terry McAuliffe didn’t act on Soering’s clemency request, as Virginia was still investigating DNA analysis indicating Soering didn’t match some type-O blood found at the crime scene.

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Information from: The Daily Progress, http://bit.ly/11Z5idQ

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Va. teacher put on leave for MLK Day lesson gone awry

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A Virginia teacher is on paid leave after her Martin Luther King Jr. Day exercise sent a 6-year-old black boy home in tears.

Vicki Chen was trying to teach a lesson about discrimination to her first graders at Greer Elementary in Charlottesville. She modified a controversial experiment that a third grade teacher, Jane Elliott, did with an all-white class the day after King’s assassination in 1968. Elliott’s idea was to treat the white children differently according to eye color so they could personally experience discrimination.

The Daily Progress reports that Donise Redd-Martin told the school board this week that her African-American son “experienced psychological trauma” when children with blue eyes were rewarded.

Assistant Albemarle County superintendent Claire Keiser said Chen stopped the lesson after realizing it wasn’t developmentally appropriate.

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Information from: The Daily Progress, http://bit.ly/11Z5idQ

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PHOTOS: ‘America’s Army museum’ begins taking shape at Fort Belvoir

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The National Museum of the U.S. Army will include 185,000 feet of artifacts, documents and exhibit space. (WTOP/Kristi King)

All those black panels, lined up like a platoon, will hold the stories of individual soldiers. The museum will have a soldier’s perspective. (WTOP/Kristi King)

Three women lead the lift mission to install the UH-1B Iroquois “Huey” helicopter in the museum’s historic gallery section. From left to right: Museum specialist Sara Bowen coordinates, manages and plans museum exhibits and artifacts; senior project manager Christine DeMorro is with Design and Production Inc.; and Tammy E. Call is the museum’s director. (WTOP/Kristi King)

The missiles shown in the upper portion of this photo are replicas and have no actual fire power. (WTOP/Kristi King)

What looks like a white tent on the left is “Grant’s Theater.” On the right is the World War I immersive experience. The historic gallery section of the museum will cover more than 240 years of Army/U.S. history, beginning with the pre-Revolutionary War militia era and continuing through to the Army of current day. (WTOP/Kristi King)

Under this covering is a Sherman tank. (WTOP/Kristi King)

“When the doors open in 2020, this is America’s Army museum,” said Tammy Call, director of the National Museum of the U.S. Army. “We show the relationship between American society and our army as we formed, as we have fought, as we protect this nation.” (WTOP/Kristi King)

FORT BELVOIR, Va. — The nation’s first military service that began as militia dating back to the 1600s is about to be the last military service branch to tell its story with a national museum.

“When the doors open in 2020, this is America’s Army museum,” said Tammy Call, director of the National Museum of the U.S. Army. “We show the relationship between American society and our army as we formed, as we have fought, as we protect this nation.”

High on a hill on the grounds of Fort Belvoir, Virginia, the museum will be accessible to the public from the Fairfax County Parkway and have free admission.

Space covering more than three football fields will feature immersive, interactive experiences and actual artifacts such as Civil War cannons and World War I tanks.

“The landing craft you see here was actually in D-Day,” said Patrick Jennings, chief of programs and education at the museum. “The Sherman tank you can see in our WW II gallery is the first Sherman tank that assisted the 101st (Airborne) at Bastogne.”

https://cdn.jwplayer.com/players/pusCR6zK-ojydegOP.js

Exhibits and theaters will help visitors feel as if they’re part of the action. Walking directly over foxholes in the immersive World War I experience, artillery explosions will sound with flashes of light. In the Army theater, seats will rumble as tanks are shown passing over desert sands and wind will blow your hair as helicopters fly overhead.

The museum is a work-in-progress with exhibits being built around larger artifacts, some not visible through protective wrapping.

On Thursday, a UH-1B Iroquois “Huey” helicopter was lifted to the ceiling of the museum’s historic gallery section using an elaborate system of chains and pulleys. The chopper suffered combat damage during its 1965 to 1973 tour in South Vietnam before being brought back to the States.

The only tank manned by U.S. troops in World War I in Germany will also be on display. “When we were restoring this tank, they found over a thousand bullet holes in this tank,” Susan Smullen of the museum said. “They actually found one bullet still lodged in the tread.”

A learning space designed for youngsters will help students develop G-STEM skills as they work in teams to complete Army missions.

The museum hopes to also entertain the very young. “We have a little playground we call Fort Discover,” Jennings said, emphasizing that the museum should prove interesting to all ages.

“Everyone can come here, have fun and learn something,” Jennings added.

There’s no set date yet for the museum’s opening in 2020.

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PHOTOS: ‘America’s Army museum’ begins taking shape at Fort Belvoir

Secure your future with the best immigration lawyers in Fairfax Virginia

The National Museum of the U.S. Army will include 185,000 feet of artifacts, documents and exhibit space. (WTOP/Kristi King)

All those black panels, lined up like a platoon, will hold the stories of individual soldiers. The museum will have a soldier’s perspective. (WTOP/Kristi King)

Three women lead the lift mission to install the UH-1B Iroquois “Huey” helicopter in the museum’s historic gallery section. From left to right: Museum specialist Sara Bowen coordinates, manages and plans museum exhibits and artifacts; senior project manager Christine DeMorro is with Design and Production Inc.; and Tammy E. Call is the museum’s director. (WTOP/Kristi King)

The missiles shown in the upper portion of this photo are replicas and have no actual fire power. (WTOP/Kristi King)

What looks like a white tent on the left is “Grant’s Theater.” On the right is the World War I immersive experience. The historic gallery section of the museum will cover more than 240 years of Army/U.S. history, beginning with the pre-Revolutionary War militia era and continuing through to the Army of current day. (WTOP/Kristi King)

Under this covering is a Sherman tank. (WTOP/Kristi King)

“When the doors open in 2020, this is America’s Army museum,” said Tammy Call, director of the National Museum of the U.S. Army. “We show the relationship between American society and our army as we formed, as we have fought, as we protect this nation.” (WTOP/Kristi King)

FORT BELVOIR, Va. — The nation’s first military service that began as militia dating back to the 1600s is about to be the last military service branch to tell its story with a national museum.

“When the doors open in 2020, this is America’s Army museum,” said Tammy Call, director of the National Museum of the U.S. Army. “We show the relationship between American society and our army as we formed, as we have fought, as we protect this nation.”

High on a hill on the grounds of Fort Belvoir, Virginia, the museum will be accessible to the public from the Fairfax County Parkway and have free admission.

Space covering more than three football fields will feature immersive, interactive experiences and actual artifacts such as Civil War cannons and World War I tanks.

“The landing craft you see here was actually in D-Day,” said Patrick Jennings, chief of programs and education at the museum. “The Sherman tank you can see in our WW II gallery is the first Sherman tank that assisted the 101st (Airborne) at Bastogne.”

https://cdn.jwplayer.com/players/pusCR6zK-ojydegOP.js

Exhibits and theaters will help visitors feel as if they’re part of the action. Walking directly over foxholes in the immersive World War I experience, artillery explosions will sound with flashes of light. In the Army theater, seats will rumble as tanks are shown passing over desert sands and wind will blow your hair as helicopters fly overhead.

The museum is a work-in-progress with exhibits being built around larger artifacts, some not visible through protective wrapping.

On Thursday, a UH-1B Iroquois “Huey” helicopter was lifted to the ceiling of the museum’s historic gallery section using an elaborate system of chains and pulleys. The chopper suffered combat damage during its 1965 to 1973 tour in South Vietnam before being brought back to the States.

The only tank manned by U.S. troops in World War I in Germany will also be on display. “When we were restoring this tank, they found over a thousand bullet holes in this tank,” Susan Smullen of the museum said. “They actually found one bullet still lodged in the tread.”

A learning space designed for youngsters will help students develop G-STEM skills as they work in teams to complete Army missions.

The museum hopes to also entertain the very young. “We have a little playground we call Fort Discover,” Jennings said, emphasizing that the museum should prove interesting to all ages.

“Everyone can come here, have fun and learn something,” Jennings added.

There’s no set date yet for the museum’s opening in 2020.

Source

from http://bit.ly/2SjyosO

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Va. lawmaker defends abortion comments, blames ‘misinformation’

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WASHINGTON — A Northern Virginia lawmaker is defending herself after her comments on abortion at a hearing caused a firestorm.

In a video that went viral, Del. Kathy Tran of Fairfax County acknowledges her legislation, which failed to advance in the General Assembly, would allow abortions up until moments before birth.

On Thursday, she said what she described is already allowed under state law.

“Right now, women are able to access an abortion in the later stages of pregnancy under certain conditions with the approval of medical doctors,” she said in a video posted to Twitter. “I’ve done nothing to change that.” She said that her bill would instead allow women “to make these decisions and access these services in a timely manner.” She added that the same bill had been introduced in the General Assembly in previous years and was introduced in the state Senate this year.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Her legislation would reduce the number of doctors who would have to certify late-term abortions are needed from three to one. It would also delete the requirement that doctors determine that continuing a pregnancy would “substantially and irremediably” impair a woman’s health. Instead doctors would only have to certify that the woman’s health was impaired.
After the initial video got widespread attention, Tran was given a police escort in Richmond.

Gov. Ralph Northam had added fuel to the fire on WTOP’s “Ask the Governor,” describing a hypothetical situation where an infant who is severely deformed or unable to survive after birth could be left to die. That prompted accusations from prominent Republicans that he supports infanticide.

Northam, a pediatric neurologist, later tweeted “I have devoted my life to caring for children and any insinuation otherwise is shameful and disgusting.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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